Friday, October 28, 2016

Pine on the Pond

Pastel - Plein Air, UArt 9x6

This small pond is guarded by a number of tall, stately pine trees.  This specific tree  stands apart and it caught my attention as it stood in the hazy morning sun at the corner of the pond.  The wind from the north ruffled the water and muted the reflections.  A few scattered clouds kept the day cool and made the work delightful.
To purchase this painting, please see my web page - "Pine on the Pond"

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Timed Study 04, Piney Point

Timed Study 3 - Piney Point, pastel 6x9

Standard "Rick's Rules" for this timed study - 22 minutes with 16 pastels + 1 pastel pencil.  I did this study on UArt 400.

The concept and motive for this study is a drawing of a pond near my home.  It was raining, and the muted tones accented the design.  I plan to do more of this concept in other light and color with more contrast in color, temperature, and value.

I permitted myself 25 minutes to mount the paper, do the drawing, and select the palette.  First the charcoal drawing with corrections...





Then most of the charcoal is removed so that the "ghost" remains.

 


Finally I chose this palette used from the study, set my timer to 22 minutes, and began.

 

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Timed Study 3 - Two Silos

Timed Study 3 - Two Silos, pastel 6x9

This is my third timed study - 22 minutes with 16 pastels + 1 pastel pencil.  I did this study on UArt 400.

This is another study from the same subject I used before.  I changed the design a little but kept the same concept from some drawings and photos I brought back from my last trip to Iowa. This is the "concept" area with drawings, photos, and the previous painting.



The concept and motive for this study is the pair of old silos that stand unused beside the steal and aluminum grain bins. This is a "between times" in Iowa; some of the fields are still too green to harvest, but other fields are already bare.

Here is the palette of pastels I used for this painting. This selection forced me to make choices based on value and temperature rather than expected hue.





With those colors in mind, I did a drawing on the paper with vine charcoal to test the concept and correct anything that seemed to need more work.  Once I was satisfied, I removed most of the charcoal with a kneeded eraser.


With the preparations finished, I set my timer to 22 minutes, and set to work.  I like the result of this study much better than the previous one, and I may dress it up a little and sign it.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Timed Study 2 - Harvest Begins

Timed Study 2 - Harvest Begins, pastel 15x24 cm. (6x9.5)

This is my second timed study - 22 minutes with 16 pastels + 1 pastel pencil.  I did this study on Pastelmat, a surface that I haven't used for some time.

For this study, I ventured outside my comfort zone of beaches and marshes and returned to my roots. I developed the design and concept for this painting was from some drawings and photos I brought back from my last trip to Iowa.  In addition to the timed study exercise, I wanted to text color and value in this composition for use in a larger work.


The concept and motive for this study is the pair of old silos that stand unused beside the steal and aluminum grain bins. This is a "between times" in Iowa; some of the fields are still too green to harvest, but other fields are already bare.

Here is the palette of pastels I used for this painting. This selection forced me to make choices based on value and temperature rather than expected hue.

   

Monday, October 24, 2016

Timed Study 1 - Rain Coming

Timed Study 1 - Rain Coming, pastel 6x9

This is the first of what I hope will be a series of timed studies in Pastel.  The plan is to limit the time for painting based on the size of the paper - 4 minutes PLUS 1 minute for each 3 square inches of the paper.  In this case the paper is 6x9 - 54 square inches; 54 / 3 = 18. So 4 + 18 = 22 minutes.  It may sound complex, but it works for me.  I also limited my  palette to 16 pieces of pastel, an arbitrary number that seems to be enough to do the work but small enough to make me think about my choices.

I started the project with a simple line drawing on paper of the subject. I am careful at this stage to make sure the proportions of the drawing are the same as the pastel paper I plan to use.



The next step is to draw the basic image/design on the pastel paper with vine charcoal.  I like vine charcoal because it permits me to make corrections and/or erase any part of the image easily with a gum eraser.  



Once I'm, satisfied with the placement of objects and layout, I reduce the charcoal drawing to a "ghost" with the eraser.  I don't want any of the black charcoal bleeding through into the image.



With a concept in mind, I then select my palette keeping in mind the self-imposed limit of 16 pieces.  I make my selections based on color values within families keeping in mind whether the result I want is warm or cool.  For this painting, I selected 2 shades of blue,  3 shades of purple/mauve (warm), 3 shades of green (warm), 3 shades of yellow, 2 orange/pink shades, and one piece of white (warm) which leans toward yellow.


With the paper and pastels in place, I set my timer to 22 minutes and start working.  When the timer goes off, I quit.

As a last caveat, if the timed work has promise, I reserve the right to go back later and "finish" the painting.  I haven't yet decided what to do with this painting.

After the Rain 2

Pastel, 9x12 on UArt

The late summer weather comes in from the northeast, and as the showers come and pass, the rain leaves the salt marsh awash in pristine color.  The wind leaves the water ruffled without much reflection which accents the color and shadows of the marsh.
To purchase this painting, please click on the link - "After the Rain, 2"